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CV/Resume Expectations Around the Globe

When applying for a job, your CV/resume plays a critical role all around the world. But every country also has different expectations when it comes to the CV. A CareerBuilder study looks at the global differences and gives useful hints for international applications.

CV expectations may vary from country to country, but there are some things hiring managers everywhere agree on: a bad resume is not going to get you the job. In a recent survey of more than 5,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals in countries with the largest gross domestic product, CareerBuilder asked employers what would cause them to immediately dismiss a CV from contention.

Job seekers around the globe need to pay particularly close attention to the following six concerns of employers, when they are submitting a CV for employment:

Spell-check, particularly in France

Submitting a CV with typos and spelling errors is the biggest annoyance to hiring managers. The top country  that confirmed they would dismiss a CVs with spelling errors was France at 68 per cent, Brazil with 67 per cent followed by:

  • Italy (65 percent)
  • US (58 percent)
  • China (56 percent)
  • Germany (52 percent)
  • Russia (49 percent)
  • UK (47 percent)
  • Japan (34 percent)
  • India (28 percent)

Don’t forget your cover letter in Germany

You may think that cover letters are not important, however employers would disagree. In Germany 39 per cent of hiring managers would not consider an application that does not include a cover letter with the following countries in agreement:

  • France (30 percent)
  • UK (24 percent)
  • India (20 percent)
  • US (13 percent)
  • Brazil (9 percent)
  • China (9 percent)
  • Italy (8 percent)
  • Japan (6 percent)
  • Russia (3 percent)

Don’t mass-produce in China

Personalizing your CV to the position you’re applying to is especially important in China, where 71 per cent of hiring managers stated that they would ignore CVs that seemed generic. 45 per cent of employers in India said the same, along with:

  • UK (42 percent)
  • Italy (39 percent)
  • France (39 percent)
  • Germany (39 percent)
  • Brazil (38 percent)
  • US (37 percent)
  • Russia (35 percent)
  • Japan (31 percent)

Also use your own words in China

Employers in China, 65 per cent of employers would dismiss CVs that copy a large amount of wording from the job posting, and in Brazil more than half of the hiring managers agree.  Be sure to use creativity in your CV in the following countries:

  • Russia (48 percent)
  • India (42 percent)
  • Italy (41 percent)
  • Japan (41 percent)
  • UK (40 percent)
  • US (32 percent)
  • Germany (24 percent)
  • France (23 percent)

Highlight your skills in India

Including a list of skills in a CV is most important when applying to positions in India, where 56 per cent of employers would immediately dismiss CVs lacking a list of skills. Similarly, 55 per cent of employers in Russia say they would reject CVs without a list of skills, followed by:

  • Germany (44 percent)
  • UK (40 percent)
  • Italy (37 percent)
  • China (36 percent)
  • US (35 percent)
  • Brazil (32 percent)
  • France (29 percent)
  • Japan (7 percent)

Keep the email address professional in Brazil

If your email address is something like partychick@email.com for any purpose, you should get a new one for your job applications. Inappropriate email addresses are grounds for immediately rejecting a CV according to 38 per cent of employers in Brazil and 36 per cent of employers in China. Other countries that value professional emails:

  • US (31 percent)
  • UK (24 percent)
  • France (24 percent)
  • Germany (22 percent)
  • Russia (20 percent)
  • Japan (16 percent)
  • Italy (14 percent)

 

 

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